News & Insights

30/09/2020

HARNESSING THE SUPERPOWER OF VISUAL STORYTELLING — Q&A WITH OUR VIDEO PARTNER THEO FATSEAS by Rebecca Thurlow



“Seeing is believing” is more than just a cliché. Humans are highly visual creatures. That makes video a powerful tool to engage an audience and communicate ideas. Research from Brightcove found more than half of all consumers and 66% of millennials reported engaging with a brand after viewing a video on social media. As businesses catch on to the medium’s potential, video has become the most commonly used format in content marketing, overtaking blogs and infographics.

During COVID-19, this trend is accelerating. The amount of time people spend online is surging and much of what they are consuming is video. A Nielsen study reveals a 60% increase in the video content watched globally. During these challenging times, the power of video to forge emotional connections makes it a valuable tool for building trust, strengthening relationships, and providing guidance to customers and investors – who are hungry for information, analysis, and reassurance.

At Honner, we partner with videographer Theo Fatseas to produce highly effective videos for our clients. The Honner team will help with the planning and scripting of your video and make sure you get your messaging right. Our experienced hosts can showcase the expertise of your spokespeople in on-screen interviews. And because we know appearing onscreen can be daunting, we offer digital media training, so you always look and sound your best. The filming and editing are handled by Theo, who delivers high production values and employs sophisticated film-making techniques to engage and connect with your target audience.

Theo is a former documentary maker who now produces corporate videos, including for the Livewire Markets platform, and is therefore a great fit for our financial services clients who want to reach out to their customers and investors with high quality visual content.  In this Q&A with Honner, Theo shares some insights on making compelling videos that resonate with audiences.

What elements of documentary making do you bring to your videos?

My experience as a documentary maker has given me an appreciation of the importance of authenticity and realism. When I look down the lens, I can tell if a person needs more direction, or if we need a second take. I can put myself in the shoes of the audience.

Another big part of it is understanding story structure. Every good story has a beginning, a middle and an end. When I’m filming, and when I’m piecing the video together during the editing phase, I’m keenly aware of the need to create a hook at the start to capture the audience and give people a taste of what they are about to see. Then you have the main body of the story, your Act 2, where you flesh out the concepts you introduced at the start. Act 3 is the closing - now that I’ve told you all this, what does it mean for the audience?

After a lifetime of conditioning from watching films and TV, people expect to be engaged. They want and expect the hook. They want to be invested in a video. If those boxes are not ticked, then you are making them do extra work.

Do you have any tips on what speakers can do to ensure a good onscreen performance?

Your performance on camera can mean the difference between being engaged and genuine or being boring and contrived. It’s a good idea to get some media training if you’re not experienced. You want to present as if you are talking to a person in a natural conversation.  While filming, actively imagine you are talking to a person one-on-one.

Is shorter always better?                         
                                                                  

When we started doing videos for LiveWire, the target length was 2-3 minutes. Now some go to 18 minutes. It depends on the content and how engaging it is. Mobile devices mean people can watch anytime so keeping it short isn’t as important anymore.

Longer videos don’t get watched during work hours – people will watch them during personal time. This suits videos that are made for a general audience.

A long video can be engaging if it has stock footage and attention to story structure, and a great, succinct presenter. An 18-minute video we made for Livewire Markets during the GFC went viral because it was very dramatic and talked about financial markets being on the brink of collapse.

How long does it take to produce a video?

It depends on the video. For an “About Us” style video, production would take a few weeks from the time of filming. A straight interview can be turned over in 24 hours. Something super urgent can be shot and edited on the premises, which is sometimes necessary with crisis management videos such as during COVID-19.

How are you operating during COVID?

I have been doing a lot of shooting in people’s homes. Some people are supplying me with video shot on iPhone or Zoom and asking me to edit it, but in terms of quality, you can’t beat old school camera and microphone. I’m now starting to return to shooting on location in the city.

If you’d like more information on using video to engage and communicate with your customers and enhance your brand, contact us at honner@honner.com.au

Stay Connected

If you wish to stay connected to Honner and receive future blogs, simply enter your email address below.

Subscribe
Filter by :

Latest News And Insights

Honner Blog 30/09/2020

HARNESSING THE SUPERPOWER OF VISUAL STORYTELLING — Q&A WITH OUR VIDEO PARTNER THEO FATSEAS

“Seeing is believing” is more than a cliché. In this Q&A, Honner’s partner videographer Theo Fatseas shares insights on making compelling videos that resonate with audiences.

READ MORE   >

Honner Blog 10/12/2019

It's a wrap - Honner's quarterly media roundup (Q419)

The shuffling of the decks continues in the world of media, with acquisitions announced and new services emerging. We cover the latest developments, insights and industry moves in our latest Quarterly Media Roundup.
 

READ MORE   >

Honner Blog 9/10/2019

It's a wrap - Honner's quarterly media roundup (Q319)

M&A remains on the agenda in the media industry as publishers and broadcasters look to offset pressure on advertising revenue. Meanwhile new digital publications continue to emerge. We cover the latest developments, insights and industry moves in our latest Quarterly Media Roundup.

READ MORE   >

Honner Blog 24/06/2019

Growing to greatness – Have regional newspapers found their white knight, and why should brands care?

Antony Catalano’s purchase of 160 regional and rural newspapers from Nine Entertainment raised hopes of better times for publishing outside the big smoke. Our latest blog looks at the challenges Catalano faces in turning the business around, and what the deal means for financial services brands seeking national reach in the media.
 

READ MORE   >

Honner Blog 11/06/2019

It’s a wrap – Honner’s quarterly media roundup (Q119)

Your Money closes, Anthony Catalano buys 150 regional newspapers from Nine, and Apple launches its subscription news service—and that’s just the start. Find the latest in news, insights, quotable quotes and industry moves in Honner’s latest Quarterly Media Roundup.

READ MORE   >

Honner Blog 1/02/2018

It’s a Wrap – Honner’s quarterly media roundup (Q417)

Change continues apace in the Australian media industry. Rupert Murdoch’s deal to sell most of 21st Century Fox is set to transform the media industry, and Facebook’s changes to its news feed recipe have sent publishers and brands back to the strategy table. And that’s just the start. In our Honner quarterly media roundup, we bring you a wrap of the latest industry news, insights and quotable quotes.

READ MORE   >

Honner Blog 27/09/2017

It’s a Wrap – Honner’s quarterly media roundup (Q317)

It’s been a big few months for media industry news, from corporate deals and asset write downs to Senate inquiries and major law reform. With so much happening, we thought it a good time to launch our Quarterly Media Roundup, bringing you the lowdown on industry news, insights and quotable quotes.
 

READ MORE   >

Honner Blog 9/06/2017

Pitching business stories to international press. Is it worth it?

The first instinct of businesses seeking media exposure is often to pitch their story to Australian publications. That’s only natural, especially if most of the firm’s customers are domestically based. However international media can be a valuable forum for the right company with the right story.

READ MORE   >