News & Insights

30/10/2018

CEO's and social media - time to step into the lightby Lucy Willatt



Earlier this week I watched a clip of a CEO of a well-known UK business, walking off camera while being interviewed on the BBC.
 
He was asked about his sizeable bonus, and whether he thought it was appropriate. He refused to answer, looked to his advisor for confirmation, and then walked off screen, blaming the journalist for a poor interview.
 
I jumped on to Twitter and LinkedIn to look this guy up. I wanted to see if he’d addressed the issue, maybe tried to explain why he did what he did. I was also keen to see if he had a presence on any platform.
 
Needless to say, he wasn’t on Twitter, and didn’t even have a LinkedIn profile (albeit it could have been deleted following said interview). The company Twitter account also ignored the ‘mishap’.  Yet the interview had hundreds of mentions on Twitter and even made the news over in this part of the world.
 
The bulk of most brands’ value is linked to reputation. But the one thing often over-looked in the reputation treasure chest is the CEO having a presence and being active on social channels.
 
Research from Hootsuite[1] has found that in Australia and New Zealand, 75% of businesses have a social media presence, but less than 10% of those businesses’ leaders are active on social channels.
 
Around 70% of unsocial CEOs worry about the perceived risk of engaging online, also citing lack of time, competing priorities, lack of expertise, uncertainty caused by past failures, lack of evidence on ROI, and legal discouragement, as reasons for shying away.
 
Yet, the same survey found that nearly 86% of executives in Australia, New Zealand, and Asia believe that having a CEO with a social presence is positive for the company reputation, and 76% believe it enhances credibility in the market.
 
Harnessing your brand’s secret weapon
 
Once upon a time a company website was essentially its shop window. It could make or break a brand, alienate people with its jargon, unfriendly imagery, poor mobile version, or no useful information.
 
But now social channels have far more power. The way a leader presents themselves on social media affects how the public sees the business.
 
We’ve all seen the rollercoaster of a year Tesla has had because of over-amorous tweeting from founder Elon Musk. And we’ve all seen what happens when airlines, supermarkets and mobile phone providers don’t respond quickly enough, or with enough compassion.


High profile social media fails always grab headlines.

Still, it’s hard to see why CEOs want to stay away from social engagement. Three out of four consumers say a CEO’s presence on social makes a brand more trustworthy, and companies with CEOs active on social media are perceived 23% more positively than companies with inactive CEOs.

These people, on average, spend more than two hours a day on social media. And more than 50% of social media users follow brands. That’s a huge window of opportunity for businesses to increase their visibility.

Consumers don’t want to hear from a corporate voice on social platforms, they want to engage with a person.  They want to experience the tone, the style, and what that person stands for, the values that person holds, the person who runs the brand they enjoy following.

Risks of using social media can be managed very simply, with the proper strategy and guidance in place. If you’d like some advice on how best to use social platforms for good, get in touch and we’ll buy you a coffee to explain more.


[1] Hootsuite 2017 https://hootsuite.com/resources/social-executive-apac%C2%A0

Stay Connected

If you wish to stay connected to Honner and receive future blogs, simply enter your email address below.

Subscribe

Latest News And Insights

Honner Blog 13/11/2018

Creativity for good: Be the Spider Man of communications

Honner’s latest blog by Senior Account Executive, DanielleVeivers unpacks insights from Public Relation’s Institute of Australia’s recent panel session on creativity for good. Read on to find out how CSR focused communications and PR can minimise business risk and help your reputation navigate good times and bad.  

READ MORE   >

Honner Blog 30/10/2018

CEO's and social media - time to step into the light

Once upon a time, a company’s website was its shop window and could make or break a brand. Now social channels have far more power. The way a leader presents themselves on social media affects how the public sees the business. This is why CEOs should be active on social media, writes Lucy Willatt. 

READ MORE   >

Honner Blog 18/10/2018

It's a wrap - Honner's quarterly media roundup (Q318)

Nine’s takeover of Fairfax, the resignation of ABC Chairman Justine Milne, and a US$1.4 billion loss from News Corp – these are just some of the developments in Australia’s media scene in recent months. In our Honner quarterly media roundup, Rebecca Thurlow brings you a wrap of the latest industry news, insights and quotable quotes.
 

READ MORE   >

Honner Blog 11/10/2018

PR principles are evergreen

Over the past century, an infinite number of things have changed in the communications and #media industries. But public relations, argues our Account Manager Eric Robledo Fuentes, hasn’t changed that much after all. And no, he’s not 100 years old by the way. His thoughts are the result of his reading of Crystallizing Public Opinion, a book by Edward Bernays published in 1923. Read on to learn about a selection of seven principles that were first laid out by the person who came to be known as the father of #PR. 
 

READ MORE   >

Honner Blog 5/10/2018

Asset backed tokenization—a huge value unlock in the making

The process of tokenization will democratise investor access to illiquid markets and unlock a sea of untapped global capital. 

READ MORE   >

View All    >